Carpal Tunnel Syndrome and its Effect on Women’s Health

Carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) is the name for a group of problems that includes swelling, pain, tingling, and loss of strength in wrist and hand. Ignoring symptoms of this common wrist problem can lead to permanent nerve damage. Women are three times more likely to have CTS than men. Pregnant women are at higher risk of developing this condition.

Carpal Tunnel Syndrome is a common condition due to pressure on the median nerve in your wrist causing numbness and tingling in your hand. Certain work activities (like frequent use of computer) are the most common risk factors. The carpal tunnel is a narrow passageway on the palm side of your wrist made up of bones and ligaments. The median nerve runs through this passageway along with tendons to the fingers and thumb.

The anatomy of your wrist, health problems and possibly repetitive hand motions can contribute to carpal tunnel syndrome. Proper treatment usually relieves the tingling and numbness and restores wrist and hand function.

 

Carpal Tunnel Syndrome (CTS)

CTS is the group of problems that includes swelling, pain, tingling, and loss of strength in wrist and hand. Our wrist is made of small bones that form a narrow groove or carpal tunnel. Tendons and a nerve called the median nerve must pass through this tunnel from forearm into hand. The median nerve controls the feelings and sensations in the palm side of thumb and fingers. Sometimes swelling and irritation of the tendons can put pressure on the wrist nerve, causing the symptoms of CTS. A woman’s dominant hand is the one that is usually affected. Nearly half of CTS sufferers have symptoms in both hands.

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